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13 Ways to Ruin A Video Game - Worst Gaming Mistakes

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April 1, 2015 | Written By: Alex Schwartz


Tags: lists, advanced warfare, call of duty, evolve, dying light, grand theft auto, destiny, shadow of mordor, need for speed, deus ex human revolution,

13 Ways to Ruin a Video Game

Video game development is not an easy task, evidenced by the years that takes to put together a successful title and the often-seen patches, changes, and fixes throughout its lifetime. However, with an ever increasingly vocal gaming community, feedback for and against certain design decisions, both visually and mechanic-based, seem out of place and represent lazy development in the modern age. Some things have gone to the wayside thankfully, including having an open-world game with no decent end-game play or forgetting to warn a player that a final mission was about to start (thus removing side missions as possible options) but others have gotten fair amounts of negative feedback from the gaming world and yet are still implemented in numerous modern games. Hoping to alleviate this and bring them to light, we present our 13 ways to ruin a video game – take note developers!

#13: Lack of Effective Customization

Advanced Warfare but Same Cookie-Cutter White Soldier; Pretty Sure I Look Nothing Like That

Advanced Warfare but Same Cookie-Cutter White Soldier; Pretty Sure I Look Nothing Like That

Gamers like to be creative – this is evidenced by the massive video-producing community surrounding the popular Grand Theft Auto V title and the various things they attempt to do for viewers. However, one of the most standard points of customization is in appearance, defining how the character they will be controlling for the game looks, sounds or more. Some games provide customization that seems lackluster, with the recent Destiny being a great example as each race had very indistinct features a lackluster performance when it came to other points of design (including ship and sparrow design). Others go the route of providing a cookie-cutout character for an RPG adventure, which is especially noticeable in first person games like Dying Light or the Call of Duty series. Adding in some simple customization, especially to the multiplayer, goes a long way to improving a games overall quality as well as giving a bit more personalization for all gamers that pick it up. I mean seriously, how hard is it to add some different color shades and not make it a hassle to do so?

#12: Lackluster and Out-of-character Final Boss Fights

After a Massive Battle Through Zombies the Game Ends with a Boring Final Faceoff with This Guy - Everyone Wanted to Dropkick Him Off the Roof (Image Credit: http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/9a2c875fcb4ee92281ef83e3d7e0977b.jpg)

After a Massive Battle Through Zombies the Game Ends with a Boring Final Faceoff with This Guy - Everyone Wanted to Dropkick Him Off the Roof (Image Credit: http://images.gameskinny.com/gameskinny/9a2c875fcb4ee92281ef83e3d7e0977b.jpg)

This one seems to be a modern fault more than anything, producing final boss fights that are often the most forgettable (or regrettable) portions of the game. A boss fight is a rather simple premise – all the skills that go into proceeding through the game should effectively come into play in the final fight, forcing you to put it all together to win that last battle. However, way too many games lately have been using sequenced fights, basic “press x to win” battles as well as lackluster and underperforming fight sequences. It is quite a disappointing feeling to go through the entire game and run up to the final battle feeling like it’s a forgettable portion of the whole experience. There have been numerous games that did this, Dying Light and Shadow of Mordor being great recent examples and others that have done it right, like Destiny. This is a simple element but one that truly defines a game as it’s the last memory for most players.

#11: Unfair AI

The Worst Offender Are Racing Games - No Matter How Fast Your Car or How Well You Play the AI Always Catches Up

The Worst Offender Are Racing Games - No Matter How Fast Your Car or How Well You Play the AI Always Catches Up

Anyone that has played a racing game has experienced making a great play, gaining a substantial lead and being passed by a supersonic speeding car with unfair AI tactics. While this was acceptable in previous generations of gaming, in modern games with higher processing power, larger memory and superior gaming engines, there has to be a better way to equalize a game when players get too far ahead. Whether this is necessary is an even greater question – why shouldn’t I be rewarded for beating the game’s own AI? AI should have similar consequences as the main players whenever possible – this applies to all realms of gaming including FPS titles and more. It’s an annoying element that quickly ruins the feeling of immersion.

#10: Consequence-Free Gameplay

Dark Souls Has One of the Best Consequence-Styles Ever, Reducing Health and Losing Currency Upon Death Makes it a Trial Worth Completing

Dark Souls Has One of the Best Consequence-Styles Ever, Reducing Health and Losing Currency Upon Death Makes it a Trial Worth Completing

Another modern focus it seems, games that contain virtually zero consequences for failing or making a mistake have gotten too popular lately. In a world filled with second-by-second checkpoint save systems, making a mistake often means having to only replay the last 15 seconds properly, allowing almost infinite retries until they can get it right. Made a mistake in inventory choices? Abandon an objective, get what you need, and come back with no cost whatsoever. While some players may enjoy this feature, there is a larger sense of accomplishment when you get pushed back slightly for making a mistake – it doesn’t have to go back to a life system but with regenerating health and excessive supplies in most games today, simply waiting or backtracking makes any difficulty almost ridiculously easy to complete. A good bottom line – if a blind monkey could complete a game through random chance, it needs some changes.

There have been some recent titles that succeeded at this feature, most notably being Dying Light taking away survivor points (and often sending you back further than you wanted) as well as Destiny (at certain points anyways). It has been proven to be possible but many seem to forget and create an all-too-easy experience that just removes the challenge.

 

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As an avid gamer for a long time, Alex began his journey with the SNES consoles and has never looked back. Alex is the Founder for UGE and handles content, administrative, and web development components.

 




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